Six Ways To Cultivate Gratitude

Gratitude

 

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What is so amazing about gratitude is that, according to recent mBIT research, gratitude or appreciation resonates at a similar wavelength to joy and love. So, by being able to practice methods of raising our frequency, we can start having some control over raising our average wavelength which in turn leads to some genuinely exciting benefits.

Gratitude is more than an expression of politeness, did you know that gratitude is fundamental to our levels of happiness and life satisfaction?  As a practice, gratitude, has been handed down from generation to generation, from the ancients to this modern day. How does gratitude affect us and why is it so important?

Let’s start by exploring some facts and figures behind our emotional, physical and mental health, starting with some concepts around energy.

At school in science class, as children we are taught about energy. All matter is made up of energy and energy can be transferred from one form to another. Energy particles have a wavelength and frequency which can be charted. On the low frequency, slow end of the spectrum are buildings, concrete, stone, rock etc. On the opposite end of the spectrum are atoms and atomic nuclei with high frequency and fast, short wavelengths. Somewhere in between is the visible wavelengths that enable us to see colour, these we are, of course, most familiar with. Each colour of the rainbow has a unique wavelength.

So, what has this got to do with our health? Well, when we chart humans on that same energy spectrum, we find the frequency is much lower than colour and higher than buildings and concrete. In his work, Dr. David Hawkins, a physician, psychiatrist, researcher and professor, measured and charted the wavelengths of human emotions in what is now known as the Hawkins Scale. His findings give us a fascinating insight into how different emotions impact our wellbeing. He discovered that we each have an average level which is determined by our average frequency. We go up and down according to the emotions we feel at any given time but our average indicates what could be called our Happiness set point. This set point also affects aspects like how optimistic our outlook is on life.

Hawkins put shame as the lowest frequency, followed in the order of guilt, apathy, grief, fear, desire, anger and pride. These are all charted below a log of 200 and this level is unhealthy for our wellbeing, adversely impacting our health and leading to disease. From 200 upwards are courage, neutrality, willingness, acceptance, reason, love, joy, peace and enlightenment. Joy and love are logged between 500 and 540. The higher the log, the better the frequency is for our health, promoting faster healing and a healthier body.

What is so amazing about gratitude is that, according to recent mBIT research, gratitude or appreciation resonates at a similar wavelength to joy and love. So, by being able to practice methods of raising our frequency, we can start having some control over raising our average wavelength which in turn leads to some genuinely exciting benefits.

The more we practice gratitude the less likely we are to develop coronary heart disease; the stronger our immune system will be; we can lower our stress levels; increase our resilience; experience less aches and pains; combat diseases that lead to disabilities; and lengthen our life span by up to 7 years. Frequency is the key so a daily practice that encourages the whole family to participate is ideal.

Finally, with gratitude for reading this far, here are six ways to cultivate more gratitude in your daily life.

 

Practice 1: Balanced Breathing

Equal Breathing Technique:

  1. Without changing your breath, count the natural length of your inhalations and exhalations in seconds. 
  2. Consciously make both parts of your breath last the same number of seconds.
  3. Practice for 2-3 minutes or 24-36 rounds. Stop and return to your natural breath if you feel discomfort in any way.
  4. When your practice is complete, return to your natural breath and practice simple awareness for one to two minutes.

 

Practice 2: Gratitude Letter and Mindfulness

  1. Bring to mind someone who did something you are extremely grateful for that you’ve never expressed your feeling to.
  2. Write a letter, address it to them directly. Be specific about the event and how it affected your life. Maximum 300 words. Pay attention to your emotions through each step of the process.
  3. Plan a visit with the recipient. Don’t reveal the exact reason. This can be done via phone or video conferencing for long distance.
  4. Ask them to not interrupt.
  5. Read them the letter. Take your time.
  6. Afterwards, be receptive to their reaction and be willing to discuss both your feelings.
  7. Remember to give them the letter when you leave.

 

Practice 3: Three Good Things

  1. Each day, identify three things that went well for you that day.
  2. Write it down!
  3. Give the event a title.
  4. Describe what happened in detail.  Who was involved, what they did or said.
  5. Explain how this made you feel. Include what you think caused this event.

 

Practice 4: Gratitude Jar

  1. At least once a day take a note and write one thing you appreciate and why.
  2. Place it in the jar.
  3. Once a month, take out the notes. Read and share gratitude with family or team members.

 

Practice 5: Gratitude Album/Collage

  1. Get a stack of lifestyle magazines.
  2. Print out happy photos of memorable events and people.
  3. Get a large canvas, art paper or art book.
  4. Cut photos and pictures that represent the things that you appreciate.
  5. Create a collage. Add your favourite inspirational quotes.

 

Practice 6: Mealtime Thanks

  1. A wonderful way to bring positivity to family mealtimes and encourage sharing of daily stories.
  2. As you sit down to eat, start the meal time conversation by sharing the things that you are grateful for that day.

1 comment

  • Very well stated and informative. I am grateful for so many things in life and, as I am reaching new levels of awareness, I am even more grateful each and every day. Thank you for this well-written blog. I am grateful for it.

    Franda Graves

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