How To Use Organisational Effectiveness to Maximise Your Value Proposition

Organisation

Purposefully designing policies and procedures around value delivery will radically change your customer perception, increase employee and customer loyalty and improve profits.

Your value proposition should be saving you money. If your value proposition isn't live and kicking in your business, you are leaking money with your ineffective resource management. Your business delivers your customer promise, or not, through its processes. Purposefully designing policies and procedures around value delivery will radically change your customer perception, increase employee and customer loyalty and improve profits.

Efficiency comes from system automation, put any process in place for any regular and frequent interaction between two people within the business. Imagine internal processes like a factory production line and take away unnecessary interruptions, interventions and approvals. The most effective systems are designed from the top down as the most senior teams have the greatest view as well as a greater depth and understanding of the business goals. The key here is more that efficiency for efficiency's sake. The systems must deliver the company's value proposition.

Manual processes can be tested first before automation and technology investment. The challenge here is to overcome the popular idea that it's a high investment, all or nothing approach. Sometimes the best processes are simple, manual steps that help two teams achieve their objectives and serve as a contract on how they do it effectively.

Eliminate all duplication, complexity and unnecessary communications. Once done, it will need sharing and testing before publishing a policy.

Working from the goal backwards, identify the minimum steps required to achieve the goal and the requirements of each step. I do this with basic flow chart symbols but this can be done using any method. Eliminate all duplication, complexity and unnecessary communications. Once done, it will need sharing and testing before publishing a policy. The aim is to bring improvements quickly and allow it to grow and be strengthened organically. So many businesses get caught up in analysis and gaining consensus. It takes so much time and effort to bring in new ways of working that it defeats the purpose.

It is the job of the senior executives to make sure the systems work for everyone in the business as well as the customer. Often, this is delegated to a more junior manager who doesn't have the breadth of vision across the business. Once approved, the policy and procedure that supports the process needs to be published and well-circulated throughout the business; and backed by the leadership teams to support the fastest adoption rate.

When employees don't fully understand the reasoning and value of new policies, it gets difficult to get everyone on board.

Having the company's value proposition at the core of the system, means that anyone not contributing to the successful delivery of the process is actually eroding value to the end customer. This should be made clear and communicated within the process. When employees don't fully understand the reasoning and value of new policies, it becomes difficult to get everyone on board.

Making no exceptions, everyone must be following and suggesting improvements. At this stage it's appropriate to allocate policing responsibility to those at management level with regular reviews and improvements to grow and develop the system. It ensures the processes remain relevant and optimised. Management may or may not be a simple task, depending on the system. However, include KPIs and metrics in the review process so that reporting is efficient and frequent.

Cascading down to teams requires policing, management and guidelines to help both adoption and development. This will probably be the largest user group so feedback is valuable for improvement. Again, providing an understanding of the value of the system in delivering the customer promise ensures any misalignment is identified and resolved. Communication needs to be two-way for the processes to be fully maximised. This is even more important to the frontline staff who often have the narrowest of views of strategy and objectives.

Aligning the entire business to the customer is neither simple nor easy. The most complicated processes and systems are often the ones that have been successfully designed and distilled to be simple and communicated easily.

Feel confident about testing and trialing any new ideas in areas of limited risk and be open to discovering new and surprise results.

Take all feedback on board from anyone within the business or customers who engage in order to build in continuous improvements and developments. Feel confident about testing and trialing any new ideas in areas of limited risk and be open to discovering new and surprise results.

While the necessity of a system introduction comes from the top down, the engagement and feedback needs to come from the bottom up. This involvement is vital for the success of a process that also adapts and moulds to serve end-customers effectively with the company's value proposition.

Continuous focus ensures constant alignment and increases the touchpoints where your business stays relevant to your customer. All too often many businesses get so caught up in doing what they always have done, they lose this customer engagement and this decreases loyalty. Use your systems to ensure value is effectively and efficiently delivered at all times and allow magic to happen by involving all your staff and teams.

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